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 Events
SHARCNET general interest webinar

the third Wednesday of the month

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 12:00 p.m.

Event information

SHARCNET is pleased to offer select general interest seminars for the benefit of the wider user community. General Interest Seminars will usually occur on the third Wednesday of the month, and we will continue to broadcast them as a webinar over lunch so a perfect opportunity for those with interest to kick back with some food and take it in. Seminars can be accessed by pointing your web broswer at the URL listed for the seminar in question shortly before the scheduled time for the seminar (see above; URL also appears in all event postings, including main Events calendar). In addition to using a web browser, there are free apps available for iOS, Android and Mac OS X for attending Fuze hosted meetings/webinars.

NOTE:
SHARCNET uses Fuze Meeting Webinar software for the purpose of providing seminars online - please joint a few minutes early so you have time to sort your sound issues.
Need help attending a webinar? See the SHARCNET Help Wiki We request that if you are intending to attend a seminar, you click the registration link and register so we have some idea of our audience. User response continues to guide our ongoing provision of these educational opportunities.

To attend in the SCAET building contact:
Ed Sykes (x2490)
or Wesley Skoczen (x8704)


SHARCNET New User Seminars

Mondays

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: around noon

Event information

Regular Introduction to SHARCNET Literacy seminar. The seminar provides an overview of available SHARCNET systems, and basic usage information including job submissions/management, queueing policies and available software and support. Attendance at this seminar enables a user to acquire SHARCNET User I certification.

NOTE:
SHARCNET uses Fuze Meeting Webinar software for the purpose of providing seminars online - please joint a few minutes early so you have time to sort your sound issues.
Need help attending a webinar? See the SHARCNET Help Wiki We request that if you are intending to attend a seminar, you click the registration link and register so we have some idea of our audience. User response continues to guide our ongoing provision of these educational opportunities.

To attend in the SCAET building contact:
Ed Sykes (x2490)
or Wesley Skoczen (x8704)



 Synopsis
The Access Grid (AG) is a high-quality multi-point collaborative video conferencing technology enabling disparate groups to work pervasively within a large-scale immersive communications environment. The initial development work and on-going technical, software and network support for the Access Grid technology began in 1999 and has been funded by the U.S Department of Energy with the major effort centered at the Argonne National Laboratories www.anl.gov in Chicago. Detailed technical information on the AG infrastructure can be found http://www.accessgrid.org including specific site locations and contact information for the 300+ nodes currently operating amongst more than 27 countries around the globe.

Some of the major areas of focus being explored by the research community with regards to the Access Grid include: collaborative workspace environments, educational course delivery, social and scientific global interaction, and multi-disciplinary applied research. These are merely a few of the areas that reside amongst a vast group of colleagues from varied disciplines (including the Arts, Science, Engineering, Medicine and Education); each node brings a unique interest and perspective to the AG project. Because the technology encompasses an open-source project, each node is encouraged to adapt or improve the AG technology platform and contribute these changes amongst the group; thereby benefiting the entire project community.

In Canada the Access Grid technology requires the relatively high-bandwidth multicast enabled network capability provided by CA*net4 - Canada's high-speed research network. In the United States this high-speed connectivity resides within Internet-2 and for other countries, various research networks around the globe. The multicast component is vital to enable the multipoint connection of as many as 60 or more sites to be simultaneously connected and able to communicate with one another.

The AG technology will operate on Windows XP, Linux or Apple's OSX and requires approximately 1.5 Mb/s of bandwidth per each connected node for fully satisfactory operation. It is also possible to bridge conventional H.323 into the AG for conventional IP users, albeit with a reduction in operability. With the deployment of ORION, Ontario's Research and Innovation Optical Network Project www.orion.on.ca, Sheridan's connectivity has increased from our original 2001 deployment of 10 Mb/s to as much as 1.0 Gb/s within the boundaries of the Ca*net4 across Canada. Sheridan received a research grant from the CFI, the Canada Foundation for Innovation www.innovation.ca and OIT, the Ontario Innovation Trust www.oit.on.ca in 2003 to install multiple Access Grid nodes at three campuses. In consultation with Sheridan's I.T. Department as well as various academic and staff components, the project group has reviewed several potential sites within Sheridan for locating these nodes and has established an initial research node at its STC campus.

Sheridan's research interests in the Access Grid technology spans a variety of application areas: Enhanced collaborative curriculum development process; Course delivery between campuses, including multiple classrooms; Enhancements to the AG software and hardware to better suit Sheridan's needs; Research into Human Factor and Human Interface Design aspects; Finally, the integration of third-party collaborative technologies into the AG. However, these objectives will likely change as the AG project evolves.

The Sheridan community stands to profit from its ongoing participation in the Access Grid project. Some of these initial benefits include:

  • Simultaneous course delivery to multiple classes/campuses
  • Collaborative curriculum development within Sheridan and between institution
  • Participation within a large global research community
  • Student, staff, and faculty participation in emerging content lectures/seminars
In 2001, Sheridan established the first operational AG node in Canada during the early stages of this project. We were active participants in the Super Computing conference that year (SC Global2001 was hosted in Denver, Colorado) and now look forward to becoming a principal site within the Access Grid community in Canada during the coming months.

 Location
Maps and directions

View traffic

 Contact
 Sharcnet Site Leader:

  Ed Sykes  ed.sykes@sheridanc.on.ca  (905) 845-9430 x2490


 Access Grid Administration:

  Wesley Skoczen  wesley.skoczen@sheridanc.on.ca  (905) 845-9430 x8704


 Network Administration:

  Chris Descheneaux  chris.descheneaux@sheridanc.on.ca  (905) 845-9430 x2338

  Alan "Derm" Dermody  alan.dermody@sheridanc.on.ca  (416) 452-5213 x2126

 

 Venue Server
AG2:
https://oa-ag2-venue.sheridanc.on.ca:8000/Venues/default

AG3:
https://oa-ag-venue.sheridanc.on.ca:8000/Venues/default
https://oa-ag3-venue.sheridanc.on.ca:8000/Venues/default

 Archives
Sheridan "Research Demonstration"

Wednesday, 21 May 2008

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 10:00 - 12:00

Event information

Overview of Sheridan’s research to date using SHARCNET (parallel security algorithms, visualization research) and demonstration of the SHARCNET portable supercomputer-in-a-box.

contact Ed Sykes (x2490)


SHARCFest 2008:
Sheridan Open House

01 May 2008

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 13:00 - 15:00

Event information

SHARCNET is pleased to introduce "SHARCFest 2008", an outreach campaign of open houses, training events and symposiums held during May and June to help educate the boarder community on the uses and importance of HPC to research. Nineteen events have been scheduled at various SHARCNET locations over the month of May, which will culminate in the annual SHARCNET Summer School and Research Day being held from June 2-6th at York University.



Megaconference IX:
Breaking Down the Barriers: Global Connections

08 November 2007

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 08:00 - 23:30

Event information

Each year, the Megaconference occurs as a result of a tremendous amount of volunteer effort and good will, with the goal of connecting people together everywhere on Earth where someone chooses to participate, in order to further the use of videoconferencing in education and research and to advance the state of the art in videoconferencing technology.

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

Parallel Visualization Deployment at a Supercomputing Center
25 October 2007

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 10:00 - 14:30
Speaker: Jean Favre, Swiss National Supercomputing Center
http://www.sharcnet.ca/Facilities/accessgrid.php

Dr. Favre is an expert in visualization and will show examples from several disciplines that can gain from using this type of equipment. The afternoon hands-on will focus on running parallel visualization on SVA in different ways, such as remote rendering, multi-tile display, etc. This is an opportunity to see what our new parallel visualization system can do. Dr. Favre's bio can be found at http://www.cscs.ch/about/Favre.php.

Please RSVP Francesca Abbruzzese francesca.abbruzzese@sheridanc.on.ca by Monday, October 22.

For additional information contact Sheridan's SHARCNET Site Lead: Ed Sykes ed.sykes@sheridanc.on.ca


Coast-to-Coast Seminar: Modelling Self-Organizing Networks with a Hidden Metric
09 October 2007

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 14:30 - 15:20
Speaker: Dr. Jeannette Janssen, Dalhousie University
http://www.sharcnet.ca/Facilities/accessgrid.php

Current models for complex networks mainly aim to reproduce a number of graph properties observed in real-world networks. On the other hand, experimental and heuristic treatments of real-life networks operate under the tacit assumption that the network is a visible manifestation of an underlying hidden reality. For example, it is commonly assumed that communities in a social network can be recognized as densely linked subgraphs, or that Web pages with many common neighbors contain related topics. Such assumptions apply that there is an a priori "community structure" or "relatedness measure" of the nodes, which is reflected by the link structure of the graph.

A common method to represent "relatedness" of objects is by an embedding in a metric space, so that related objects are placed close together, and communities are represented by clusters of points. In this talk, I will discuss graph models where the nodes correspond to points in space, and the stochastic process forming the graph is influenced by the position of the nodes in the space.

The work presented was done in collaboration with William Aiello, Anthony Bonato, Colin Cooper, and Pawel Pralat.


SHARCNET Virtual Open House
02 October 2007

SCAET building, AG room S213
Time: 14:00 - 16:00
http://www.sharcnet.ca/Facilities/accessgrid.php

SHARCNET is having an Open House and you are invited! Come out to SHARCNET's virtual Open House and meet researchers from across Ontario. SHARCNET's video conferencing rooms will be online for this event to showcase their capabilities. The rooms are already being used for meetings, seminars, research collaborations and even courses. Come and see what these facilities can offer you.


SCGlobal
11-17 November 2006

Tampa, Florida, USA
sponsored by IEEE Computer Society
http://sc06.supercomp.org/

SuperComputing (SC06), the premier international conference on high performance computing, networking and storage, will convene in November 2006 in Tampa, Florida. This year the conference will take its inspiration from Albert Einstein who said "Computers are incredibly fast, accurate and stupid; humans are incredibly slow, inaccurate and brilliant; together they are powerful beyond imagination."

SCGlobal will play a major part in SC06 by linking geographically diverse communities from around the world and allowing them to showcase the latest in high-end collaborative technologies.


The 6th Annual Access Grid Retreat
15-17 May 2006

Ann Arbor, MI, USA
Co-hosted by Internet2
http://www.mcs.anl.gov/fl/flevents/ag/agr06

The Access Grid began as a community effort in terms of development, support, education, and training and it continues to grow as a result of this approach. The AG Retreats, an annual tradition, reflect this community involvement and are critical to the continued development, utility, and improvement of the AG.
The AG Retreat program provides an interactive forum for the Access Grid community including developers, node operators and users. This year's Retreat will include information about the current state of the Access Grid software and community, and the road ahead, including the next major release of the Access Grid software, AG3.


Virtual Environments and Interactive 3D: A Reflection Spanning 20 Years
Friday , 28 April 2006 9:00-10:00 a.m.

Prof. Bob Stone, Director, Human Interface Technologies Team, University of Birmingham and Research Director, Human Factors Integration Defence Technology Centre.

The late 1980s were marked by the births of what were to become two slowly converging fields of endeavour, one ultimately becoming the ?saviour? of the other. Virtual Reality ? the ?louder?, more dominant sibling of the new era in Information Technology and interactive media ? captured the imagination of a global audience by promising a brave new world characterised by immersive displays, wearable interfaces, body augmentation and online rich sensorial virtual worlds. In stark contrast, the gaming community, for a long time snubbed by its VR relative as being a pursuit not worthy of even the most basic of acknowledgement, entered the interactive 3D world without a murmur, yet delivered a foundation upon which many of today?s key graphics developments are based. As the years progressed, VR ? once the firm favourite ? evolved to experience a turbulent adolescence and then faded rapidly into premature (but predictable) obscurity. Over the same time course, the 3D gaming market gradually increased in strength, promoting immersion through content, as opposed to technology. Today, PC and console games represent (arguably) the most potent driving force behind affordability and innovation in graphics hardware to date, delivering usable, accessible content generation software tools and impressive rendering engines for ?serious? applications. Prof. Stone will present his own personal view of the highs and lows of the last 20 years and where lessons can be learned to help ensure the growing serious gaming community does not make the same mistakes of its VR counterpart.

Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this meeting at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville. You will find this room at the extreme south-east corner of the building within space shared with the PeopleSher group.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

Cultural Cybernetics: Using Informatics to Bridge the Universal/Local Knowledge Divide
Thursday 27, April 2006 17:30-18:30

The Seedbed Initiative for Transdomain Creativity and CHASS invite you to attend a talk presented by Research Fellow Ron Eglash on Thursday, April 27 at 4:30 PM, at NCSA’s auditorium. This event will be broadcast on the access grid. A reception will follow.

Abstract

Many of the threats to sustainability and social justice are grounded in claims for the universality of science and technology. The claims for genetic inferiority of non-whites, the focus on oil and uranium for our national energy strategy, the over-use of pesticides and other disastrous decisions derived their legitimacy from scientific authority. Yet diminishing the authority of science by applying relativist social construction is equally disastrous, as it invites religious authority and other “closed society” knowledge claims to fill the gap. Cultural cybernetics is one way to allow an anti-relativist constructivism, using informatics to bridge the universal/local knowledge gap. Ron Eglash holds a B.S. in Cybernetics, an M.S. in Systems Engineering, and PhD in History of Consciousness, all from the University of California. A Fulbright postdoctoral fellowship enabled his field research on African ethnomathematics, which was published by Rutgers University Press in 1999 as African Fractals: modern computing and indigenous design. He is now an associate professor of Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He recently co-edited Appropriating Technology: Vernacular Science and Social power (UM Press 2004). His current project, funded by the NSF, HUD, and Dept. of Education, translates the mathematical concepts embedded in cultural designs of African, African American, Native American, and Latino communities into software design tools for secondary school education. The software is available online at http://www.rpi.edu/~eglash/csdt.html
This event is co-sponsored by Seedbed and CHASS

Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this meeting at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville. You will find this room at the extreme south-east corner of the building within space shared with the PeopleSher group.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

Access Grid in Education Virtual Institute
11 April 2006 4:30 p.m.

Everyone is always welcome to join us at the monthly meetings of the AG in Education EPIC Virtual Institute!
This month we will discuss the upcoming AG Retreat.
EPIC Access Grid in Education

Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this meeting at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville. You will find this room at the extreme south-east corner of the building within space shared with the PeopleSher group.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

4th InterPlay performance Dancing on the Banks of Packet Creek
Friday, 31 March 2006 8:00 - 11:00 p.m.
Saturday, 1 April 2006 8:00 - 11:00 p.m.
Sunday, 2 April 2006 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.

poster
Another Language Performing Arts Company and the University of Utah Center for High Performance Computing presents the fourth InterPlay performance Dancing on the Banks of Packet Creek, directed by Jimmy Miklavcic.
InterPlay is a multimedia, multi-artist, telematic, and collaborative art form that is performed and transmitted over Internet 2 utilizing Access Grid technology. Invited national and international institutions, artists, scientists and technologists collaborate and participate with Another Language in this InterPlay form.
Dancing on the Banks of Packet Creek is an exploration into the tenuous devotion that we have towards the inundating wave of digital information and non-experiential knowledge. Packet Creek depicts the Internet with its flow of disassembled pieces of data that course throughout the world like schools of spawning salmon. Dancing on the Banks is our ritualistic gyrations that we express as we create, disseminate, search, and acquire this electronic epistemological knowledge.

Using the metaphor of fluid motion and dynamics we will portray the immense amount of this non-experiential knowledge and the influence that it has on us. The expansive range between truth and fiction or frivolity and importance are just some creative investigations and artistic expressions that are explored through music, dance, video, computer graphics and remote motion capture MIDI control.

Invited national and international institutions, artists, scientists and technologists collaborate and participate with Another Language in the InterPlay form. "Dancing on the Banks of Packet Creek" will be an exciting blend of images and sounds using the Access Grid Video Conferencing Technology into a Real-time Collaborative Surrealistic Cinematic Performance. Local live performers will be joined in this performance by ArtGrid participants from University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center, Boston University, University of Maryland, Purdue University and the Envision Center for Data Perceptualization, and Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario Canada. As an Internet2 member connected to the Abilene Network, the University of Utah provides the network infrastructure and computing facilities that make the InterPlay process possible.

For more detailed information, visit http://www.anotherlanguage.org/interplay


Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this presentation at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

Access Grid in Education Virtual Institute
14 March 2006 4:30 p.m.

Everyone is always welcome to join us at the monthly meetings of the AG in Education EPIC Virtual Institute!
This month we will discuss the upcoming AG Retreat.
EPIC Access Grid in Education

Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this meeting at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville. You will find this room at the extreme south-east corner of the building within space shared with the PeopleSher group.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

SMPTE meeting
09 January 2006

An invitation has been extended to Sheridan Staff and Students to participate (via the Access Grid) in an upcoming SMPTE meeting (Society of Motion Picture Television Engineers):

The meeting is at 7pm on Tuesday January 10th. It will be an interactive look at issues facing the broadcast industry. It is a very lively and well attended meeting.

A complete description will be posted at http://www.smpte.org/sections_chapters/toronto/yyz.htm

Sheridan's meeting room can accommodate a limited number of participants for this meeting at our research node located in room A-23d at the STC campus, 407 Iroquois Shore Rd., Oakville. You will find this room at the extreme south-east corner of the building within space shared with the PeopleSher group.
(map: http://agfileserver.sheridanc.on.ca/contact_oakville.php)

Due to limited seating, it is requested that you make advance reservations with Wesley Skoczen (x8704) to confirm a seat.

Sheridan Collage is preparing new shoes for Finance Minister
07 May 2005

Keeping up with the tradition* of wearing new shoes on budget day the Finance Minister will receive new shoes from Sheridan artist/designer during live Internet event.
Finance Minister Greg Sorbara will be at Rayerson University in Toronto from where, via Access Grid, he will direct final steps of creation of new shoes by Sheridan's designer located at Sheridan College in Oakville. Location: NCSA Venue Server - Landspout Room, Time 10:30 a.m EDT, May, 10, 2005
On the next day the Minister, wearing the new shoes will deliver his second budget.

*Tradition - alternative link
 TV report - requires QuickTime



Sigraph 2005
July 31 - august 03, 2005

Los Angeles, USA
Co-hosted by Internet2
Sigraph via Access Grid